Articles

 

  • Consummating a Transformational Career Path

    It wasn't that long ago that people were questioning whether the role of the CIO was still needed in enterprise companies. A lot has changed in recent years. Digital skills and digital capital now constitute 22.5% of the global economy, according to Accenture. Companies have only just begun to unlock the potential for digital and need tech-savvy CIOs who understand how digital technologies can be applied to generate business value.

  • Rethinking Career Development for Millennials

    Digital disruption is forcing companies to support new ways to communicate with customers and CIOs to harness new IT skills and capabilities from their workforces. For CIOs, Millennials represent a sizeable portion of IT staffers who either already have these skills or require additional training to strengthen these skill sets.

  • The Art of Self-Promotion

    High-performing CIOs aren't always recognized for the breadth of their achievements. CEOs and other C-level executives who are stretched thin and have multiple direct reports and responsibilities can't keep track of everything that the CIO accomplishes.

  • The Role of Disruption in Career Mobility

    According to a 2015 study conducted by Harvey Nash and KPMG titled "CIO Survey 2015: Into an Age of Disruption," the majority of CIOs and other business leaders who were polled believe that not only will their organizations be impacted by digital disruption over the next 10 years, but that the transformation that's taking place will provide their organizations with a competitive advantage.

  • The Rise of the Externally-Focused CIO

    I had a recent conversation with Gregory Roberts, Managing Director in Accenture's Communications, Media and Technology practice which inspired a fascinating exchange: What if CIOs and CFOs had similar career trajectories?

  • Earning - and Keeping - A Seat at the Table

    For CIOs, gaining a seat at the table among other C-level executives isn't a destination: it's a journey. Securing a place among the executive team that makes the major strategic decisions for the enterprise is an enormous accomplishment for any IT leader.

  • Best Practices for Climbing the Career Ladder

    Not all CIOs aspire to run a company. But for those that do, there are a number of steps that can be taken to become more attractive CEO candidates. One recommendation is by taking steps to shift the view of IT as a cost center to one that provides innovation and financial value to the enterprise.

  • Developing the Soft Skills Needed for Career Advancement

    Some CIOs have risen through the technical ranks to reach their current positions. Increasingly, many are moving into the CIO role from business backgrounds. But regardless of the path taken, most successful CIOs have managed to scale the career ladder not solely as a result of their technical or business acumen but also thanks to their mastery of soft skills, including communication, collaboration, conflict resolution, and coaching.

  • Planning Your Next Career Move

    According to various studies, the average tenure for a CIO today is about five years. The span has expanded in recent years due to a variety of factors. In many cases, CEOs recognize the need for CIOs to have more time to execute on technology/business strategies.

  • Rising Up to the Corner Office and Beyond

    It used to be that there was an industry-wide perception of a glass ceiling that prevented CIOs from moving out of their roles as technology leaders and into other corners of the C-Suite.