High-performing CIOs aren’t always recognized for the breadth of their achievements. CEOs and other C-level executives who are stretched thin and have multiple direct reports and responsibilities can’t keep track of everything that the CIO accomplishes.

This is just one of the reasons why CIOs need to promote themselves and their team’s accomplishments. Making others aware of your accomplishments will create opportunities for promotions and salary increases. But that isn’t the only rationale for self-promotion.

Raising awareness about the performance of the IT organization (and the CIO’s leadership of the group) can help senior executives to more deeply appreciate the amount of value that the CIO and IT bring to the enterprise. Doing so is increasingly important in a landscape where some business leaders question the importance of having a CIO or otherwise make extensive use of external IT resources.

The IT organization can also benefit from a CIO’s promotional efforts. The IT organization is only as strong as its people. IT staff who know that they have a CIO who is looking out for their best interests will reward the CIO with enthusiasm and loyalty.

CIOs who want to promote themselves without coming across as braggarts can focus on the work that’s being done by the IT organization and the accomplishments that have been made. These triumphs can be communicated during presentations with the board, in IT steering committee meetings, and other forums that bring together senior executives. Presentations that tell a story, focus on outcomes, and call out the accomplishments of individual performers can highlight the value of the work that’s been done and the people who are behind it.

Having current or former business colleagues to tout your achievements is another way to highlight a CIO’s accomplishments with the added weight of having a respected peer endorse your feats. When a fellow C-level executive backs a CIO’s contributions to the business on his or her LinkedIn profile, it’s a great way of demonstrating a CIO’s exploits to current (and future) employers.

Promoting the accomplishments of the CIO and the IT organization isn’t completely self-serving. Sharing stories with the C-suite and line of business leaders about business projects that the IT organization has worked on, the challenges that were overcome and the results that were achieved can be a way of creating awareness with senior management while making real connections with people about the work that IT is doing with the business. It’s also an effective way to build credibility with the C-suite and demonstrating your value to the business.

“The CIOs that are going to stand out going forward are not those who just sit at the table and wait for an idea to pop up that they can partner with the business to drive. But (those who) instigate and talk about the art of what’s possible using technology to drive incremental value for the company and new markets for customers that the company may not be servicing today,” says Steven Rullo, CIO at GE Capital – Treasury in an HMG Strategy video.


Key Takeaways

  • CEOs and other C-level executives who are stretched thin and have multiple direct reports and responsibilities can’t keep track of everything that the CIO accomplishes.
  • Raising awareness about the performance of the IT organization (and the CIO’s leadership of the group) can help senior executives to more deeply appreciate the amount of value that the CIO and IT bring to the enterprise.
  • Having current or former business colleagues tout your achievements through LinkedIn recommendations and other forums is another way to highlight a CIO’s accomplishments with the added weight of a respected peer offering their perspective.