Mobile Workflow News BlockOrganizational leaders across industries are continuously looking for ways to deploy enterprise mobile apps that can improve employee productivity by enabling workers to get more work done efficiently wherever they may be – whether they’re commuting, working from home, or simply somewhere outside the office.

A study of two million mobile app deployments by Apperian bears this out. Office productivity apps, such as mobile apps for expense reporting, project management, document creation, business intelligence reporting, and meeting tools, currently comprise 12% of all enterprise mobile apps that are in use, according to the Apperian study.

To ensure that enterprise mobile apps are truly hitting the mark for how employees do their jobs and the tasks they need to complete, it’s imperative for CIOs and app project teams to gain a thorough understanding of the activity streams and work processes used by different work groups.

A good starting point is embedding mobile app developers and other project team members in a target work group such as marketing or field service. Getting a first-hand look at how employees do their jobs and the information they regularly access can provide project team members with valuable insights into employee workflows that can benefit application design.

Companies often ‘mobilize’ existing enterprise applications to help make them more accessible to on-the-go employees. But this doesn’t mean that legacy apps have to be maintained in the status quo. Transitioning enterprise apps for mobility offers terrific opportunities to improve upon existing workflows to enhance the employee experience while boosting productivity.

A classic example is in sales. When salespeople meet with prospects that may be toward the front-end of the sales funnel, opportunities sometimes arise for inking an agreement ahead of schedule. For these reasons, many salespeople have asked for mobile SFA (sales force automation) apps that include the ability to capture a customer’s electronic signature during a client meeting. Asking employees about the type of functionality they’d like to have added to existing apps can help to identify opportunities to further improve workflows.

Enterprise mobile apps also need to be designed with flexibility for future functionality requirements. Discussions with both employees and line-of-business leaders can help unearth future capabilities that can be worked into enterprise mobile apps.

For instance, healthcare practitioners such as physicians, nurses, and clinicians may request the ability to remotely monitor patients through the use of wearable devices. Meanwhile, executives may ask for additional inputs from external market data in the data dashboards they use to stay on top of industry and market shifts.

“Innovation is positioning your technology organization to be a driver and not a receiver of thought,” said Jeannine McConnell, Enterprise Strategist at ServiceNow in an HMG Strategy video. “This means understanding the business and knowing where the business is going and positioning yourself more for the ‘Amazonian’ age of Uber where people are living their lives with their thumbs on their iPhones.”

Key Takeaways

  • Organizational leaders are continuously looking for ways to utilize enterprise mobile apps that can improve employee productivity by enabling workers to get work done more efficiently wherever they may be.
  • To ensure that enterprise mobile apps are meeting productivity goals, it’s important for CIOs and app project teams to gain a thorough understanding of the activity streams and work processes used by different work groups.
  • Discussions with employees and line of business leaders can help unearth future capabilities that can be incorporated into enterprise mobile apps.